Banner Projects.jpg
Cert Rockets.JPG
Video Payload Group.jpg
ESRA.jpg
Banner Projects.jpg

Projects


 

 

 

 

SCROLL DOWN

Projects


 

 

 

 

Cert Rockets.JPG

Certifications


 

 

 

Certifications


 

 

 

 

NAR Certifications

All members have the opportunity to participate in a certification program by the National Association of Rocketry (NAR). This is perfect for those who wish to build and fly High Power Rockets (HPR). HPR Level 1 Certification allows the purchase and use of H and I impulse class motors while Level 2 Certification allows the purchase and use of J, K and L impulse class motors. Prospective members should not be discouraged by this task. Senior members will walk through the process and will provide one on one instruction if needed.

During the Fall 2016 semester, 17 members successfully built and launched their own certification rockets! Of that, 8 members passed the HPR Level 2 Written Exam to earn a Level 2 Certification. For the Spring 2017 semester, 5 members are currently working on their certification rocket with 3 seeking a Level 2 HPR Certification.

 

Certification Rocket Diagram


 
 
Video Payload Group.jpg

Battle of the Rockets


Battle of the Rockets


 

Target Altitude

Team Lead: Tobias Behrens

The objective of the Target Altitude competition is to build a launch a rocket to 1213 feet using no larger than a G impulse class motor. The altitude difference from 1213 feet is used for scoring where the lowest score wins. Three attempts are allowed where the two best scores are added together for the final score for the event. This task is approached by calculating the appropriate weight of the rocket based on thrust provided by the motor and adjusting the rocket's weight according to the target height. Computer simulation and testing will provide the team with the information needed to reach the target altitude.

 
 
 

Target Altitude Rocket Diargam

Target Altitude Rocket Model


 

Planetary Lander

Electronics Lead: Justin Green

Mechanical Lead: Alex Brandt

The objective of the Planetary Lander event is to launch a rocket above a predetermined height and deploy a planetary lander. The team needs to design a lander capable of orienting itself upright after landing and transmit telemetry data to a ground station. In order to bring the rocket to the ground safely we must it deployed under its own parachute separate from the rocket parachute. Then, when just above the ground, the parachute would detach allowing the rover to maneuver.

 

Planetary Lander Rocket Diagram

 
Lander Model.png
 

Lander Exploded View


The Competition

When: April 21st - 23rd

Where: Westover, Md

ESRA.jpg

Research and Development


 

 

 

Research and Development


 

 

 

 

Overview

New this year is the creation of a Research and Development (R&D) branch for CRT. R&D projects allow members to participate in projects outside the scope of Certifications and Battle of the Rockets. Typically, a member will draft a proposal for a concept he/she wishes to explore and present it to the Executive Committee. Components of the proposal include an overview, purpose, possible team members (must be CRT members), expected milestones, preliminary budget, and risk mitigation plans. Upon approval, the team may pursue the project in compliance with the guidelines determined by Exec and are required to write a brief technical report upon completion of the project. This will serve as reference future CRT projects or as a baseline for continued development.

 

 

Rolleron

Team Lead: Tobias Behrens

Used on Sidewinder missiles, the Rolleron concept is a passive stabilization technique that involves wheels mounted on the trailing edge of the rocket's fins. In flight, the wheels spin to create a gyroscopic effect that keeps the rocket on a desired flight path. Exploration of this concept involves fabrication of multiple wheel designs and a test stand. After ground tests, a prototype rocket will be manufactured for flight tests. A modular rocket design will allow easy instillation of the different wheel designs and a regular fin to act as the control. Computer simulations and data acquisition from test launches will help determine the effectiveness of a specific wheel design.

 

Wheel Concepts


 

Boosted Dart

Team Lead: Layee Chau

The Boosted Dart is CRT's largest endeavor yet! Continuing on last year's developments, the Boosted Dart concept is a two stage rocket with an unpowered second stage, the Dart. After motor burnout, the booster stage will separate from the dart due to its higher drag coefficient and with the assistance of pneumatics. The dart will coast up to a higher altitude and deploy its non-pyrotechnic recovery system at apogee. This is unique in that the drogue and main parachutes will deploy from the tail of the dart using pneumatics for ejection (not an explosive charge).

Measuring 10 feet, 9 inches tall with a maximum diameter of 7.5 inches, this rocket will be capable of carrying a 10 pound payload up to 10,000 feet using an M impulse class motor. Additionally, the dart includes Air Brakes for accurate altitude control. This allows for high altitude and even microgravity experiments thanks to the recovery system deployment method.

 

Boosted Dart Rocket Diagram

 
 

Dart Diagram

This project will not be possible without notable contributions of the following individuals:

Ben Ault, Tyler Bauer, Allyson Beach, and Alex Luck